Tag Archives: hlsl

SlimDX and Shaders – Constant Buffers

Setting up

Having played with a few GLSL shaders in C++, I thought that moving to a DirectX/HLSL solution sould be fairly simple.

Creating the most simple pixel shader was easy enough, and SlimDX is a decent wrapper for DX in C# – so after an hour or so I had the standard working triangle floating in space. I wanted to go further (obviously), and having spent the last few days delving into the demoscene and finding the most amazing site for pixelshader techniques (http://www.iquilezles.org/www/index.htm) I wanted to have a shader to work with (x,y) coordinates that were between (-1,1) rather than absolute screen coordinates.

This requires passing the current render area width and height to the shader to normalise with. This is done using Constant Buffers and on the shader side looks like:

 

cbuffer ConstBuffer : register(c0)
{
	float2 resolution;
}

// Simple vertex shader
float4 VShader(float4 position : POSITION) : SV_POSITION
{
	return position;
}

// Pixel shader
float4 PShader(float4 position : SV_POSITION) : SV_Target
{
        // Get normalised (x,y)
	float2 p = -1 +  2 * (position.xy/resolution);

        // Spikes in the corner
	float c = abs(p.x*p.y);
	return float4(c,c,c,1.0f);
}

 

To get the resolution variable into the register for the shader to use, you must create a ConstantBuffer in the program code and assign it to the shade. The Constant Buffer must be a size which is divisible by 16, so if your data is too small, just put it in a bigger buffer.

// Create data stream, we only need 8 bytes, but round up to 16
var resolution = new DataStream(16, true, true);
// Fill the stream with width/height info - I'm using a renderform
resolution.Write(new Vector2(form.ClientSize.Width, form.ClientSize.Height));
// Rewind the stream
resolution.Position = 0;
// Create and bind a buffer
context.PixelShader.SetConstantBuffer(new Buffer(device,     //Device
                                                 resolution, //Stream
                                                 16,         // Size
                                                 // Flags
                                                 ResourceUsage.Dynamic,
                                                 BindFlags.ConstantBuffer,
                                                 CpuAccessFlags.Write,
                                                 ResourceOptionFlags.None,
                                                 4),
                                      0); // Register

This lets us run the above shader, giving us:

Simple Shader results

 

Bonus

Having played on shader toy, I repurposed the Deform effect for a static image.

Shader:

cbuffer ConstBuffer : register(c0)
{
	float2 resolution;
}

// Simple vertex shader
float4 VShader(float4 position : POSITION) : SV_POSITION
{
	return position;
}

// Pixel shader
float4 PShader(float4 position : SV_POSITION) : SV_Target
{
        // Get normalised (x,y)
	float2 p = -1 +  2 * (position.xy/resolution);

        // Deform focus
	float2 m = float2(0.2f, 0.1f);

        // Deform
	float a1 = atan((p.y-m.y)/(p.x-m.x));
	float r1 = sqrt(dot(p-m,p-m));
	float a2 = atan((p.y+m.y)/(p.x+m.x));
	float r2 = sqrt(dot(p+m,p+m));

	float2 uv;
	uv.x = 0.2 + (r1-r2)*0.25;
	uv.y = sin(2.0*(a1-a2));

	float w = r1*r2*0.8;
	float c2 = abs(uv.x*uv.y);
	float4 col = float4(c2,c2,c2,1.0f);

	return float4(col.xyz/(0.1+w),1.0f);
}

Result:
Deform shader